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Sunday, October 12

  1. page Theodore Roosevelt & Trust Busting edited {theodore-roosevelt-picture.jpg} Theodore Roosevelt in his presidential years ... York City in…
    {theodore-roosevelt-picture.jpg} Theodore Roosevelt in his presidential years
    ...
    York City inon October 17,
    ...
    the United States.(1901-1909)States.(1901-1909). Before becoming
    ...
    He was Bestbest known as Teddy the Trust
    ...
    compete with it.them. Theodore Roosevelt
    {moz-screenshot.jpg}
    He tried to break up monopolies too, because monopolies are when a specific individual or enterprise has control over a particular product. This way there is no competition and the costumer is at a disadvantage. The company can price their product as high as they want and people will buy it because it’s the only company with that product. Without monopolies we have the option of buying the best product at the best price because we have a variety. He ended up “busting” the giant railroad trust, the Swift & Company beef trust, Standard Oil, the American Tobacco Company, and more.
    ...
    them, especially when trading goods by ships.
    The canal was 77km long and over 21,900 workers
    died while construction.construction was going on. The distance
    Fransisco to New York via Panama Canal was about
    9500km, while traveling around Cape Horn is about
    ...
    He was the first President to ride in an automobile.
    {trf19.jpg} This picture shows Thedore Roosevelt's Family
    By: HunGyu,Arushi, Niki, ArushiHunGyu
    Works Cited
    "Histeria! Theodore Roosevelt - Bully Bully." You Tube. 8 Oct. 2008 <in.youtube.com/watch?v=vcUhfdeztOs&feature=related&gt;.
    (view changes)
    8:27 am

Thursday, October 9

  1. page Telegraph Telephone Radio edited Key Inventions: Telegraph, Telephone and Radio By: Alisha P, Nandini D and Paolo F The telegraph…
    Key Inventions: Telegraph, Telephone and Radio
    By: Alisha P, Nandini D and Paolo F
    The telegraph, telephone, and radio and telegraph were some
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    life back then without any
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    these inventions. Not being ableUnable to communicate
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    send massages across.across lets say...500 miles around the world. It would
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    if it waswere a simple
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    and Guglielmo Marconi-Radio.Marconi-Radio for inspiring many more invention later on up till today.
    {http://xenophilius.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/alexander_graham_bell.jpg} {http://www.old-picture.com/mathew-brady-studio/pictures/Samuel-Morse.jpg} {http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0d/Guglielmo_Marconi.jpg}
    The
    Alexander Graham Bell- Inventor of the Telephone
    The
    telephone has
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    live today. Life
    Life
    has beenbecome so much easier. Now, We can
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    to people from faraway distances.who are miles away. If someone
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    would be to email, or to send
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    business calls now have gone
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    communicating over theyour cell phone. The
    ...
    keep in touch.touch with your friends and family.
    The Radio
    ...
    also helped advancein advancing our daily life. Thelife today. A radio can
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    many things. Entertainment for one,Such as entertainment , listening to the news and alsonews, or even two way
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    before the telephone.
    Lastly
    telephone arrived. Today many people use the radio to listen to music in their car; or even listen to the news and weather in their city.
    {http://www.old-picture.com/mathew-brady-studio/pictures/Samuel-Morse.jpg} Samuel Morse- inventor of the Telegrpah and Morse Code
    Lastly
    the telegraph, helped advance daily life too. Back,it allows us to send pictures around the globe in a matter of seconds, and could possibly lead to the webcam. However, beck when it
    ...
    the telegraph even allowed people
    ...
    to the west coast,West Coast, about important information happening. News PapersWith the telegraph, news papers began publishing news,crimes and gossip, speeches for the elections all
    ...
    be, they stills
    till
    helped civilization
    ...
    creations’ of theit's original. For
    (view changes)
    11:57 pm
  2. page The Roots of the Industrial Revolution edited ... In the 17th century, about 90 percent of the European population lived in a rural area. This b…
    ...
    In the 17th century, about 90 percent of the European population lived in a rural area. This began to change when feudal lords began to realize that they were making far more money from sheep’s wool than the crops that their peasants were inefficiently growing. These feudal lords began forcing the peasant off of the land that they had worked for their entire life and that their ancestor had worked countless generations before them. These peasants were replaced with valuable sheep and moved off to large cities in search of jobs.
    During this period of a high unemployment rate, the assembly line started to become a very efficient form of mass production that incorporated a lot of jobs. This form of production was used in large buildings that held all of the machines and equipment needed. These were called factories. Early in the industrial revolution, factories needed to be close to running water because this water turned large water wheels that powered the machines in side. Later, these factories were powered by steam engines. The steam engine was invented by Thomas Newcomen in 1710. It was later modified by James Watt to power these machines so that factories would not have to be near running water. The inventions of these two men made them the fathers of the industrial revolution. {blaue.jpg} A Map of Europe made during the 17th Century
    Sources
    www.english.ucsb.edu/faculty/cpaster/courses/fc/blaue.jpg
    www.physics.weber.edu/carroll/honors_images/newcdiag.jpg
    www.kmoddl.library.cornell.edu/biographies/Watt/Watt_sm.jpg
    www.puhsd.k12.ca.us

    (view changes)
    11:45 pm
  3. page SWEATSHOPS edited Sweatshops in the Industrial Revolution Created by Scott, Dana, and Nikaya Sweatshops is term f…
    Sweatshops in the Industrial Revolution
    Created by Scott, Dana, and Nikaya
    Sweatshops is term for a production area, usually in the textile business, that refers to a factory or home based business that has long hours and small pay. In other words, a sweatshop is a factory that employs many people and makes them work along time for little money {anti_sweatshop.jpg} In a sweatshop, the goal is to create as many commodities such as coats, shirts and toys as possible as quick as possible. To achieve this, workers do only do one thing, like cut out left arms, or hem a collar, and then they pass it on to the next person who does the next thing. This form of labor is called the assembly line , and it caused sweatshop production to skyrocket. Typically, workers are paid per piece, and this is called piecemeal. Workers were paid a certain amount of money for every piece completed. To gain a large salary, you have to work really fast and hard to complete as many pieces possible before the work shift was up. However, the payment for each piece might be as low as fifty cents.
    ...
    by Nike to to Chinese workers)
    (act {DD205_2_001i.jpg} {Sweatshop_Map.jpg}
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    companies like Nike,Nike , Levi Strauss,
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    with sweatshops. {2004-12-6-sweatshops-in-la.jpg} It's incredibly
    ...
    sweatshop products.
    While some people are fighting against sweatshops, there are not enough. Sweatshops have survived a hundred years and almost no action has been taken against companies that use them. Not enough people understand the fact that sweatshop labor has infiltrated almost every brand name company in existence. The hard reality is that the average consumer is always going to want a good deal on a shirt or a computer, and sweatshop labor will be there to provide them with it.

    Sweatshop Bibliography
    "United Students Against Sweatshops." 1998. University of Southern California. 9 Oct. 2008 <http://www.studentsagainstsweatshops.org/>.
    "Empowering Workers, Informing Consumers." History. Sweatshop Watch. 4 Sep 2007 <http://www.sweatshopwatch.org/index.php?s=53>.
    Hornberger, Jacob G.. "Economic Liberty and the Constitution, Part 6." The Future of Freedom Foundation. Nov 2002. EyeWitness to History. 24 Sep 2007 <http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761555175/Sweatshop.html#p2>.
    (view changes)
    9:51 am
  4. page SWEATSHOPS edited Sweatshops in the Industrial Revolution ... by Scott, Dana Dana, and Nikaya ... a factory t…
    Sweatshops in the Industrial Revolution
    ...
    by Scott, DanaDana, and Nikaya
    ...
    a factory that that employs many
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    like cut outleftout left arms, or
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    the assembly line,line , and it
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    Industrial Revolution was was fueled by sweatshops to
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    developing countries werewhere restrictions are
    (act {DD205_2_001i.jpg} {Sweatshop_Map.jpg}
    ...
    with sweatshops. It's incredibly sad to see the average consumer purchase goods made by a Thai girl slaving away, just to make money for her family to survive. Yet this young girl's work does not go in vain, as many people across developed and westernized countries are beginning to mobilize against the companies mentioned above. Some famous "Anti-Sweatshop Movements" like the USAS consist of students fighting for child laborer's rights by staging demonstrations and boycotting sweatshop products.
    Sweatshop Bibliography
    "Empowering Workers, Informing Consumers." History. Sweatshop Watch. 4 Sep 2007 <http://www.sweatshopwatch.org/index.php?s=53>.
    (view changes)
    9:34 am
  5. page Theodore Roosevelt & Trust Busting edited ... shortening the ship routes, and would be benifit for them, especially when trading goods by s…
    ...
    shortening the ship routes, and would be benifit for
    them, especially when trading goods by ships.
    The canal was 77km long and over 21,900 workers
    died while construction. The distance between San
    Fransisco to New York via Panama Canal was about
    9500km, while traveling around Cape Horn is about
    22,800km.

    ←Map of Panama Canal
    Presidential firsts
    (view changes)
    9:03 am
  6. page Theodore Roosevelt & Trust Busting edited ... He tried to break up monopolies too, because monopolies are when a specific individual or ente…
    ...
    He tried to break up monopolies too, because monopolies are when a specific individual or enterprise has control over a particular product. This way there is no competition and the costumer is at a disadvantage. The company can price their product as high as they want and people will buy it because it’s the only company with that product. Without monopolies we have the option of buying the best product at the best price because we have a variety. He ended up “busting” the giant railroad trust, the Swift & Company beef trust, Standard Oil, the American Tobacco Company, and more.
    Trust busting is not the only reason Theodore Roosevelt is one of the best known presidents. He won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1906 for mediating the Russo-Japanese war making him the first American ever to win that prize. The first president to ride an automobile, go in a submarine, and leave the country was Theodore Roosevelt. He was a writer, big-game hunter, soldier, conservationist, ranchman, military colonel, president, and more. Roosevelt also set The Great White Fleet around the world which was a battle fleet that completed a tour of the globe from December 16, 1907 to February 22, 1909. He was trying to demonstrate the growing American military power and blue-water navy capability.He has added a lot to the national forests in the West, reserved lands for public use, and fostered great irrigation projects. This is why Theodore Roosevelt is one of the top 10 best and most remembered presidents of the United States.
    {http://panama-maps.com/images/mapscomoptimized-panama-canal.gif} Map of Panama Canal
    Theodore also supported seperation of Panama from
    Colombia and negotiated to build Panama Canal. He
    paid 10 million dollars, because he new it would be
    shortening the ship routes, and would be benifit for
    them, especially when trading goods by ships.
    ←Map of Panama Canal

    Presidential firsts
    On August 25, 1905 he became the first U.S. President to ride in a military submarine when he boarded the USS //Plunger// and ran submerged in it for 55 minutes.
    (view changes)
    8:36 am

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